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ABOUT ABNY

ABNY is a non-profit organization dedicated to the constant growth and renewal of New York City’s people, businesses and communities. We are a coalition of business, labor, non-profit and political leaders focused on exploring and implementing ideas that keep the city moving forward. With more than 300 member organizations, ABNY incorporates a comprehensive and diverse view of the issues and challenges facing New York City. 

In keeping with ABNY's mission to make New York City a better place to live work and visit, the ABNY Power Breakfasts and Young Professionals Network serve to bolster civic engagement. ABNY Power Breakfasts offer an opportunity for elected and government officials, as well as civic and business leaders to present the ideas and policies they believe can help foster a better New York. The ABNY Young Professionals Network is a unique opportunity for the future leaders of New York City to explore the importance of civic engagement and learn about the critical issues facing our city and state. 

Citywide ABNY Poll Shows COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy Among New Yorkers

(New York, NY January 25, 2021) – 57 percent of New Yorkers will take the vaccine as soon as it is available to them – while 42 percent express hesitancy about the vaccine, according to a poll commissioned by the Association for a Better New York (ABNY). The independent poll of 1,549 New York City residents (18+) was conducted January 16-18, 2021.
The survey reported:
  • 57 percent will take the vaccine as soon as it is available to them;
  • 10 percent will only take the vaccine after someone they know received it;
  • 14 percent will only take the vaccine after many people they know receive it;
  • 14 percent are unsure if they will take the vaccine at all; and,
  • 4 percent will refuse the vaccine.   
Steven Rubenstein, chairman of ABNY, said: “A strong New York depends on vaccine adoption – for the health of our fellow New Yorkers and, with that, the City’s economic recovery. This is critical, especially in the communities that were disproportionately impacted by the pandemic. As New Yorkers, we need to work together, listen to the concerns of those who are hesitant, and provide the information people need to make decisions and get vaccinated.”
Melva Miller, chief executive officer of ABNY, added: “The communities that have been disproportionately affected by COVID-19, are the same communities that have experienced long-standing systematic health and social inequities. These are the same communities that have a deep distrust of government and the systems responsible for administering a COVID-19 vaccine. We must understand the strategies that can mitigate vaccine hesitancy among these communities. This data will help us guide actions that will provide equitable access to the vaccine, particularly for people of color, who are bearing the disproportionate burden of the virus and have faced longstanding disparities in health.”
Racial and Geographic Concerns
  • 20 percent of Black/African American (Black) and 19 percent of Asian/Asian-American/Pacific Islander/other (AAPI) respondents remain unsure if they will accept a COVID-19 vaccination, compared to 10 percent of white New Yorkers.
  • 8 percent of Black respondents were likely to refuse the vaccine. That is four times greater than White/Caucasian (white) or AAPI respondents (2 percent) and twice as likely as Hispanic/Latino (Latino) respondents (4 percent).
  • 80 percent of Black respondents and 69 percent of Latino and AAPI respondents say that concerns about effectiveness are significant or somewhat significant in shaping their decision about whether or not to get vaccinated.
  • 8 percent of Bronx residents say they will never take the vaccine, compared to 2 percent of Manhattan residents.
  • 49 percent of residents of the Bronx also indicated that concern about side effects was a significant factor in their decision-making. 
  • 18 percent of respondents in Queens and Staten Island remain unsure if they will accept the vaccination as opposed to 14 percent of Brooklyn and Bronx residents and 9 percent of Manhattan residents.
Public Awareness
  • 69 percent of all respondents say that they have enough information to make an informed decision about the COVID-19 vaccine.
  • 31 percent still say they do not, with non-white New Yorkers (AAPI respondents 39 percent, Black respondents 38 percent, Latino 30 percent) up to twice as likely as white New Yorkers (19 percent) to say they do not, indicating a need for a public awareness campaign.
Trusted Messengers
  • 83 percent of respondents say they trust or trust a lot in their physician or healthcare provider when it comes to the COVID-19 vaccine.
  • 71 percent of respondents say they either trust or trust a lot in information delivered by Dr. Anthony Fauci.
  • 65 percent of all respondent trust or trust a lot in information delivered by President Joseph Biden on COVID-19 issues.
  • Among Black respondents, President Biden is more trusted than Dr. Anthony Fauci (68 percent to 66 percent).
Persuasive Tactics
  • 81 percent of respondents said work, travel or school requirements would be a very important or important factor as to why they may receive the COVID-19 vaccine.
  • 71 percent of those surveyed say that seeing friends and family members get the vaccine and not get side effects is a very significant or significant factor for them.
  • 26 percent of Latino and 18 percent of AAPI respondents were more much concerned about the cost of the vaccine compared to white respondents (6 percent), signaling a need to communicate to these groups that the vaccine is free.
  • 83 percent of Latino New Yorkers said the convenience of taking the vaccine was either a very important or important factor for them.
  • 79 percent of Staten Island resident also said the convenience of taking the vaccine was either a very important or important factor for them.
You can view the poll in its entirety here.
Methodology
From January 16-19, the research firm Elucd surveyed a statistically representative sample of 1,549 New York City residents (18+) with a margin of error of 2.5 percentage points, including the design effects. Respondents were recruited by targeted digital advertisements, which reached a diverse and highly representative sample of respondents in multiple languages. Data was rake weighted by race, sex, age and region so weighted survey totals match the US Census totals, according to standard statistical practices. For more on the firm’s approach, visit: https://elucd.com/methodology.
About: The Association for a Better New York (ABNY)
For nearly 50 years, ABNY has worked as a catalyst to bring business, political, labor, and non-profit leaders together to address problems facing the economic and social well-being of the city. Under the leadership of Chairman Steven Rubenstein and Chief Executive Officer Melva Miller, the organization continues to carry out its mission by providing forums and programs that work to build a better New York.

 

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01.22.20 - Power Breakfast with Brooklyn Borough President Adams


Kyumon Murrell
Program Coordinator, 
Philanthropic Advising Services
ABFE: A Philanthropic Partnership 
for Black Communities
 

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